Mascot Towers - not all it's cracked up to be

Mascot Towers – not all it’s cracked up to be


It has been almost one month since residents of the Mascot Towers building in Sydney were evacuated from there homes. The evacuation was sparked by major cracks appearing in the beams of the building.

When will residents return to their homes?

With repairs predicted to take at least 12 months, residents have been informed that it is unlikely they will return to their homes in the near future.

Can residents collect their belongings?

After not being able to return to their homes since the evacuation, residents were granted access to collect their belongings for a four-hour period last Sunday night.

Who is paying for the damages?

Under NSW law, building defects are only covered under warranty for the first six years after the development is complete. Due to the building being 10 years old, Mascot Towers is no longer under warranty.

The state government announced that they would fund a multi-million dollar emergency assistance package until the liability of Mascot Towers can be determined. The package also offers interest free loans to residents of up to $400 per night to assist with temporary accommodation.

Engineering reports

According to a new engineers report that was sent to residents last Monday night, the Mascot Towers building is “moving in a downward motion”.

The “downward motion” was not elaborated on in the report, however, the northern and eastern boundaries of the building were reported as having the movement.

At last Thursday night’s meeting an engineer informed residents that he does not expect to be able to deliver a full report on the building within the initial four week predicted timeframe.

It has also been released that the buildings surrounding Mascot Towers have been reported to be leaking and cracking. One particular building has been reported to showing signs of deterioration for five or six years.

If you believe your building is at risk with a major defect Star BMS recommends that you engage an industry professional as soon as possible to provide a relevant report. As well as this report, it is important that your Committee and/or Building Manager is doing a monthly walk around to identify any possible defects. Regular committee meetings should be held where any concerns can be discussed. 

Our many years in the industry has showed us that buildings which are not cared for properly, through a combination of a lack of planning and poor maintenance standards, will lose value.

Failure to invest in a maintenance plan can lead to large amounts of money being spent on emergency repairs, as well as the risk of unsupervised contractors carrying out substandard work. This can lead to a rapid decline in the condition of a property, and rectification of these issues is often costly for the Body Corporate/Owners Corporation.  If you have any concerns regarding your building, click here to contact StarBMS today



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